HANK WILLIAMS; LOST HIGHWAY – CACTUS CHRONICLE


shapeimage_1“Lighting (Don Darnutzer) and sound (Eric Stahlhammer) were critical as transition indicators to and from regular settings and Hank’s live performances and were done so well, you might start to think you were at a Hank Williams concert instead of a Hank Williams play.”

 

Original Article:

http://edweb.tusd.k12.az.us/cactuschronicle/2005-2006/Issue%204%20PDF/Page%204%20.pdf

 

ATC’s Hank Williams: Lost

Highway travels the fast lane

 

by April Putney

FOR THE CACTUS CHRONICLE

If you’ve never heard of Hank

Williams, after seeing the Arizona

Theater Company’s musical production

of Hank Williams: Lost

Highway at 330 South Scott in the

Temple of Music and Art from November

26 through December 21,

you won’t forget him soon.

Mark Harelik and director Randal

Myler co-wrote the script based on

the life and times of the influential

country/blues music star Hank Williams

(Van Zeiler), following closely

the ups and downs of his band, The

Drifting Cowboys, as Hank rises to

and falls from fame, a tragic victim

of life in the fast lane.

Wrought with familiar and nostalgic

characters like Mama Lily

(Margaret Bowman), Hank’s gospel

enthused southern mother, or the

soulful Tee-tot (Mississippi Charles

Bevel) who taught Hank the ropes

of Blues music, Hank Williams: Lost

Highway is well cast using aesthetically

fitting actors who have not only

acting ability to support the show,

but the musical talent to steal it.

Costumes (Robert Blackman)

were used efficiently to emphasize

character and plot nuances

like Hank’s change into a blue

suit when the drugs and alcohol

begin to take their toll, the red in

the back of Hank’s unfaithful wife

Audrey’s (Regan Southard) dress at

his funeral, or the luminous white

outfits the cast wears in the spotlight

when they join in to sing “I saw the

light.”

Lighting (Don Darnutzer) and

sound (Eric Stahlhammer) were

critical as transition indicators to and

from regular settings and Hank’s live

performances and were done so well,

you might start to think you were at

a Hank Williams concert instead of a

Hank Williams play.

Hank Williams: Lost Highway is

a story enjoyable by long-time Hank

Williams fans, those unfamiliar with

his timeless music, and anyone looking

to see a great play. Country music

today has been so transformed from

what it was when Hank Williams was

alive that the music genre in the play

should become a non-issue for people

who are anti-country.

The Arizona Theater Company

will run Hank Williams: Lost Highway

from November 26 through

December 21 at the Temple Of

Music and Art in Tucson, From

December 29 to January 22 at Herberger

Theater in Phoenix, and at

the Mesa Arts Center from February

3 until February 12. For ticket

information contact ATC’s box

office at 520-622-2823 or online at

arizonatheater.org.